Boise Cascade saves plywood operations, curtails lumber operations in Alabama

Plywood factory in Havana, Alabama. Boise Cascade recently announced it was upgrading its plywood facilities at its Havana and Chapman, Alabama.

Photo By Boise Cascade

BOISE, Idaho — Boise Cascade Company said it has indefinitely curtailed lumber production in Chapman, Alabama. The curtailment will affect approximately 80 positions.

The plywood operations at the Chapman location are not part of the curtailment.

A Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification (WARN) Act notification was provided to impacted employees and specifies that operations will cease on January 28, 2024.

“The team has worked diligently every day; however, a combination of challenges, including required future investments and overall profitability, has led to this decision,” said Chris Seymour, Senior Vice President of Manufacturing Operations. “It was a difficult and unfortunate decision, but after evaluating a number of factors over the past year, it is not feasible to continue operating at an efficient level.”

Boise Cascade announced on July 25 that it has completed the previously announced acquisition of Coastal Plywood Company and its manufacturing operations in Havana, Fla., and Chapman, Ala.

“We’re very pleased to welcome these new associates to the Boise Cascade team,” said Nate Jorgensen, CEO. “We look forward to serving our customers with this expanded capacity.”

In June, the Boise Cascade Co. reached an agreement to acquire Coastal Plywood Company, including its two manufacturing locations, from Coastal Forest Resources Company for $512 million.

Coastal is a provider of plywood, lumber, and treated wood products throughout the eastern U.S. The purchase agreement includes its locations in Havana, Florida, and Chapman, Alabama, which employ approximately 750 people.

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Larry Adams | Editor

Larry Adams is a Chicago-based writer and editor who writes about how things get done. A former wire service and community newspaper reporter, Larry is an award-winning writer with more than three decades of experience. In addition to writing about woodworking, he has covered science, metrology, metalworking, industrial design, quality control, imaging, Swiss and micromanufacturing . He was previously a Tabbie Award winner for his coverage of nano-based coatings technology for the automotive industry. Larry volunteers for the historic preservation group, the Kalo Foundation/Ianelli Studios, and the science-based group, Chicago Council on Science and Technology (C2ST).