Wood is in style: veneer chip embroidery sets off spring fashions by Chanel
January 31, 2016 | 4:10 pm CST
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[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"82253","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","typeof":"foaf:Image"}}]]Wood and veneer gained caché in the fashion world last week, as the Paris show saw veneer chip embroidery in Chanel's lineup for Spring-Summer 2016 fashions in designs by Karl Lagerfeld. 

Lagerfeld, favoring beige and natural fabrics, had his seamstresses hand cut veneer into leaf and petal shapes, then hand paint them and apply Svarkoski crystals. The material was then stitched to garments, and the whole displayed in a three-story wood structure with garage door and double bifold folding woods.

Using fabrics in ecru, ivory, sand, dove, putty, taupe and mocha, Lagerfeld wanted to add elements that would be natural and compatible. He designs for Chanel.

Lagerfeld worked with a variety of wood for the garments, in the form of shavings and fragments, as sequins, and adding crystals and pearls to embellish his Spring‑Summer 2016 Haute Couture collection.

"We had to make everything because those – there are no sequins in wood," Lagerfeld said.  "We had to make everything. Normally, they make the embroidery with existing material. We had to create the material because those things don’t exist."

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About the author
Bill Esler | ConfSenior Editor

Bill wrote for WoodworkingNetwork.com, FDMC and Closets & Organized Storage magazines. 

Bill's background includes more than 10 years in print manufacturing management, followed by more than 30 years in business reporting on industrial manufacturing in the forest products industries, including printing and packaging at American Printer (Features Editor) and Graphic Arts Monthly (Editor in Chief) magazines; and in secondary wood manufacturing for WoodworkingNetwork.com.

Bill was deeply involved with the launches of the Woodworking Network Leadership Forum, and the 40 Under 40 Awards programs. He currently reports on technology and business trends and develops conference programs.

In addition to his work as a journalist, Bill supports efforts to expand and improve educational opportunities in the manufacturing sectors, including 10 years on the Print & Graphics Scholarship Foundation; six years with the U.S. WoodLinks; and currently on the Woodwork Career Alliance Education Committee. He is also supports the Greater West Town Training Partnership Woodworking Program, which has trained more than 950 adults for industrial wood manufacturing careers. 

Bill volunteers for Foinse Research Station, a biological field station staddling the border of Ireland and Northern Ireland, one of more than 200 members of the Organization of Biological Field Stations.