Alien Forest Pest Explorer targets tree predators
December 7, 2022 | 2:56 pm CST

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. -- Purdue University and the U.S. Forest Service teamed up to develop the Alien Forest Pest Explorer, an interactive web tool that combines information from multiple sources to show the impact of different forest insects and diseases, and the potential for further damage.
 
“We want to better understand the relationship between pests and tree hosts, as well as assess the vulnerability of our forests, so that we can make the best decisions to preserve and protect them,” said Songlin Fei, professor of forestry and natural resources at Purdue’s College of Agriculture, who leads Purdue’s Digital Forestry Initiative. “This was designed for everyone, not only for the professionals. Pest and disease prevention begins in your backyard. We want to put this tool in the hands of anyone who cares for trees so they understand what pests they may face, how to identify them and how to protect their trees and forests.”

Spongy moth alien pest forest explorer
The Spongy Moth, Lymantria dispar, is an invasive insect that threatens the health of forests. It is included as one of the top 16 most damaging pests in the new Alien Forest Pest Explorer interactive web tool.

Fei collaborated with Nicole Kong, associate professor of geographic information systems at Purdue, to organize the data, and design and develop the tool, which Purdue hosts.

“With the COVID pandemic, we all became much more accustomed to using dashboards and realized the empowerment of being able to easily find information and trends specific to our area,” said Kong. “One can think of this as like a COVID dashboard for forest health and pest outbreaks. We worked to visualize the data in the most useful and intuitive way.”

Alien Pest Forest Explorer emerald ash borer dashboard
The Alien Forest Pest Explorer interactive web tool combines information from multiple sources to show the impact of different forest insects and diseases.

The Alien Forest Pest Explorer includes maps of pest species distributions; the growth, mortality and removal rates of host species; as well as trends in host abundance and information about the pests. The annually updated data has resolution to the county level.

The dashboard and its database of information are critical to forest health protection, said Tracy Tophooven, the acting station director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northern Research Station.
“In the past few centuries, hundreds of invasive insects have been introduced to the United States through a variety of means,” Tophooven said. “This tool integrates the Northern Research Station’s critical invasive species research with forest inventory and analysis data to enable users to view county-level data to meet local challenges posed by invasive insects.”

Check out the Alien Pest Forest Explorer web tool.

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Rich Christianson is the owner of Richson Media LLC, a Chicago-based communications firm focused on the industrial woodworking sector. Rich is the former long-time editorial director and associate publisher of Woodworking Network. During his nearly 35-year career, Rich has toured more than 250 woodworking operations throughout North America, Europe and Asia and has written extensively on woodworking technology, design and supply trends. He has also directed and promoted dozens of woodworking trade shows, conferences and seminars including the Cabinets & Closets Conference & Expo and the Woodworking Machinery & Supply Conference & Expo, Canada’s largest woodworking show.