OSHA's Top 10 safety violations
November 18, 2021 | 6:13 pm CST

OSHA recently released its list of top 10 violations for 2021.

ITASCA, Ill. -- The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released its preliminary Top 10 most frequently cited workplace safety standards for fiscal year 2021. 

The list was presented at the 2021 NSC Safety Congress & Expo, this past October.

Fall Protection (1926.501) remains at the top of the list for 11 years in a row, followed by Respiratory Protection (1910.134) and Ladders (1926.1053). Hazard Communication, which spent the last several years at number two, moved to the fifth spot on this year's list.

"Throughout the pandemic workplace safety has become more important than ever," said Lorraine Martin, NSC president and CEO. "Although incredible advancements are made in safety each year, the OSHA Top 10 list reminds us that we must continue to pinpoint areas where we can improve so we can better prioritize workplace safety in the future world of work."

The Top 10 most frequently cited workplace safety standards for FY 2021 are:

  1. Fall Protection – General Requirements (1926.501): 5,295 violations
  2. Respiratory Protection (1910.134): 2,527
  3. Ladders (1926.1053): 2,026
  4. Scaffolding (1926.451): 1,948
  5. Hazard Communication (1910.1200): 1,947
  6. Lockout/Tagout (1910.147): 1,698
  7. Fall Protection – Training Requirements (1926.503): 1,666
  8. Personal Protective and Lifesaving Equipment – Eye and Face Protection (1926.102): 1,452
  9. Powered Industrial Trucks (1910.178): 1,420
  10. Machine Guarding (1910.212): 1,113
     

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Larry Adams is a Chicago-based writer and editor who writes about how things get done. A former wire service and community newspaper reporter, Larry is an award-winning writer with more than three decades of experience. In addition to writing about woodworking, he has covered science, metrology, metalworking, industrial design, quality control, imaging, Swiss and micromanufacturing . He was previously a Tabbie Award winner for his coverage of nano-based coatings technology for the automotive industry. Larry volunteers for the historic preservation group, the Kalo Foundation/Ianelli Studios, and the science-based group, Chicago Council on Science and Technology (C2ST).