ANSI Standards Push by Architectural Woodwork Institute POTOMAC FALLS, VA - Since 1961 AWI has actively written and published standards for the architectural woodwork community. Each of these standards was built on consensus across national regions, and each new edition improved upon its predecessor and kept pace with changes in the industry.

AWI says its new Architectural Woodwork Standards Edition Two represents another step of improvement for architectural woodwork standards.

At its January 2014 meeting, AWI’s Board of Directors decided it was time to take our association’s standards development to a higher level by becoming an American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Accredited Standards Developer with the goal of achieving ANSI approval of future architectural woodwork standards.

"I am pleased to announce our association has been accepted as an Organizational Member within the ANSI community, and on August 15, 2014 AWI received official approval as an ANSI Accredited Standards Developer (SDO)," says Phil Duvic, president of AWI.

Though the AWS Edition Two became effective on October 1, 2014, the work of writing standards for our industry is not left idle. Right now, AWI’s Technical Committee is actively working on the association’s next generation of standards writing. Procedures for ANSI approved standards development will further AWI’s ongoing initiative to expand interaction with stakeholders of the industry it serves.

In addition to WI and AWMAC, other associations and stakeholders across the spectrum of general interest, users and producers will be invited to engage the process of achieving ANSI approved architectural woodwork standards. This initiative is a manifestation of AWI’s dedication to the architectural woodwork industry, the need for continuous improvement and new tools for globalizing markets.

Some of the anticipated direct benefits of an ANSI approved standard include:

1) simplified presentation of criteria,
2) improved promotion of our standards internationally and
3) reduced cost of standards development.

Ancillary benefits include 1) greater use of technology presenting educational aspects of compliance with architectural woodwork standards resulting in 2) more user-friendly instruction and learning.

About AWI

The Architectural Woodwork Institute (AWI) is a nonprofit trade association founded in 1953. Today, AWI represents nearly 4000 members consisting of architectural woodworkers, suppliers, design professionals and students from around the world.

Source: AWI

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