CLEVELAND, OH - Global demand for windows and doors, currently $138 billion, is forecast to rise 6.8 percent annually through 2015 to $192 billion, according to a new study by the Freedonia Group.

Gains will be exaggerated in comparison to the weakened market forming the baseline in 2010 in the developed world, says Freedonia, particularly in the U.S. Residential building construction will outpace the nonresidential building construction globally. In most developed countries the residential market was far more adversely impacted by the recession in 2009 and 2010, Freedonia confirms.

China, the world’s largest national window and door market, will expand its share of global demand from 27 percent in 2010 to 30 percent in 2015. Continuing rapid economic growth, as well as an increase in the average size of a housing unit in China, will further bolster gains.

Although demand for windows and doors in China will expand at a robust 9.2 percent per year, the U.S. market for windows and doors will post a strong recovery and expand 7.7 percent per year through 2015, after declining by around 25 percent between 2008 and 2010

Plastic is projected to be the fastest growing material for window and door products through 2015. Gains for plastic windows and doors will be supported by continuing demand for vinyl windows because of their low cost, durability, minimal maintenance requirements and superior energy efficiency. Plastic windows will account for 37 percent of global window demand in 2015.

Traditionally, wood doors were seen to be more attractive than fiberglass doors; however, improvements in processing techniques have enabled manufacturers to make fiberglass that more closely resembles wood.

World demand to rise 6.8%
annually through 2015
Global demand for windows and doors is
forecast to rise 6.8 percent per year
through 2015 to $192 billion, significantly
exceeding the pace of growth registered
between 2005 and 2010. Gains will be
exaggerated by an extremely weak 2010
base in the developed world, particularly
in the US. Demand for windows and
doors in the residential building construction
market will outpace demand in the
nonresidential building construction
market as in most developed countries
the residential market was far more
adversely impacted by the recession in
2009 and 2010.
China to expand position
as largest market, but at
a slower pace
China, the world’s largest national
window and door market, will expand its
share of global demand from 27 percent
in 2010 to 30 percent in 2015. Continuing
rapid economic growth and industrialization,
as well as an increase in the
average size of a housing unit in the
country, will bolster gains. Although
demand for windows and doors in China
will expand at a robust 9.2 percent per
year, this will represent a major slowdown
in comparison to the performance
of the past decade.
The US market for windows and doors
will post a strong recovery and expand
7.7 percent per year through 2015, after
declining by around 25 percent between
2008 and 2010 when the country
experienced a major economic recession
that was spurred by the downturn in the
housing sector. Demand in Japan and
Western Europe will also post solid
recoveries after declines in 2009 and
2010, although neither experienced
problems as significant as the US did in
those years.
Plastic to be fastest
growing material
Plastic is projected to be the fastest
growing material for window and door
products through 2015. Gains for plastic
windows and doors will be supported by
continuing demand for vinyl windows
because of their low cost, durability, minimal
maintenance requirements and
superior energy efficiency. Plastic
windows will account for 37 percent of
global window demand in 2015. Further
gains will be spurred by rising demand
for plastic materials in the smaller door
segment. In particular, fiberglass entry
doors will capture market share from
wood and steel entry doors. Fiberglass
doors are less expensive, more aesthetically
pleasing and more energy-efficient
than steel doors. Traditionally, wood
doors were seen to be more attractive
than fiberglass doors; however, improvements
in processing techniques have
enabled manufacturers to make fiberglass
that more closely resembles wood.

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