Swamp white oak trees - a forest of 400 - now provide a genuine calm in the reborn plaza at the World Trade Center where nearly 3,000 people died over a decade ago today.

The leafy branches of swamp white oak trees block out noisy Manhattan. They surround two large waterfalls with 52,000 gallons of water cycling through pools every minute, dropping into the void at the bottom.

These natural elements create a fitting, restorative environment to display the 2,983 name of men, women and children killed in the 2001 and 1993 terrorist attacks - etched in bronze on the memorial pools and illuminated in a calming light.

The Callery-pear, originally living near the World Trade Center, was nearly killed by the collapse of the buildings and ensuing fires, but has since recovered.

Quercus bicolor, the swamp white oaks that will surround the pear, grow rapidly and can survive 300 to 350 years, reaching 65–80 feet in height at maturity.

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A Callery-pear tree, originally living near the World Trade Center, has also been replanted. It was nearly killed by the collapse of the buildings and ensuing fires, but has since recovered. Quercus bicolor, the swamp white oaks now surround the pear, are expected to grow rapidly, with a life expectancy of 300 to 350 years, and reaching 65–80 feet in height at maturity.

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