If your company manufactures wood panel-based products in California or sells to customers there, you should be complying with the state’s Air Toxics Control Measure implemented by the California Air Resource Board. You should also be aware that the CARB rules regulating formaldehyde emissions are scheduled to become more stringent in coming years.

The CARB ATCM is a complex matrix of rules that is wide in scope and far-reaching in impact. It covers applicable products, resin chemistry, emission testing, labeling, records keeping, imports, exemptions, enforcement and more.

How well do you know the CARB wood panel emissions rule? Test your knowledge by answering the following True or False questions I culled from Version #5 of CARB’s Frequently Asked Questions updated last October.

A link to the answers is at the end of the quiz.

1. Oriented strand board is covered by the airborne toxic control measure.

2. Compression molded toilet seats are subject to the regulation.

3. Corbels and rosettes made with MDF are not subject to the regulation.

4. Packing material, such as “dunnage” or “offal” from particleboard is not considered in the regulation.

5. The regulation does apply to rental furniture manufactured before 2009 when phase one of the ATCM was implemented.

6. The regulation does not apply to curved or bent plywood pieces used to make snowboards or skateboards.

7. Lumber core product is subject to the regulation.

8. MDF made by a “wet forming” process is not subject to the ATCM.

9. Testing of finished furniture products conducted for non-CARB-approved emission standards are considered reasonable prudent precautions under the rule.

10. Manufacturers of particleboard, hardwood plywood, and medium density fiberboard cannot officially designate their composite wood products as CARB-compliant (or refer to their low-emitting products) on their boards.

In the event you haven’t gotten your fill of CARB trivia, click here to check out all 97 FAQs on the CARB Web site.

CLICK HERE FOR CARB QUIZ ANSWERS.

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