European exports of woodworking technology fell in the first half of 2013, with industry leader Germany dropping 14.8% to €753.6 million. Italy fell 7.9% to €513.2.

"The January-June period was tough for export from the Old Continent," says a report from the Research Office of Acimall– the Italian wood machinery trade group while.

Germany, at the top of the ranking, recorded the greatest decrease in exports of the countries covered in the report. "It went slightly better for Italy, which still remains in negative territory," says Acimall. Woodworking equipment makers in China and Taiwan gained ground on their major European competitors. Export growth from the United States and Austria lead the pack, with their sales "basically addressed to neighbor markets," Acimall says.

EXPORT FROM MAJOR PRODUCING COUNTRIES 

2013 January-June period, in million Euros. 

Country 

Total value 

2013/2012 variation 

 

 

 

Germany

 753.6

-14.81

Italy

 513.2

  -7.91

China

 331.6

   0.45

Taiwan

 203.0

   0.84

Austria

 171.4

   1.54

United States

 152.9

   8.36

Source: Acimall Studies Office, November 2013. 

The United States is the biggest market worldwide, Acimall says, with a Asian gaining market share there. "As usual, there is a massive flow of equipment manufactured in Asia, while European competitors are still led by Germany in the leading position."

Russia buys most of its equipment from Germany, "with a solid leadership supported by the supply of big plants for panel production," says Acimall. 

"Competition is particularly tough in China," says Acimall. Germany is the top exporter there, with over €60 million in the first half 2013, followed by Taiwan (€40 million) and Italy (just below €30 million).

Germany and Italy take the biggest share of woodworking technology export to Brazil, mainly as a result of effective partnership agreements with local resellers and, in some cases, huge direct investments. In Europe, Germany and France are the most important destination markets; it is worth highlighting the penetration of made-in-China technology in Germany, a strongly growing trend.

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