NEW HOLLAND, Pa. – Newly retailored by Rutt HandCrafted Cabinetry, the Morgan Series captures the current revaluation of handcraft and desire for fine workmanship. This refreshed reintroduction offers a cleaner, more delicate balance in the components of the series. Rails and stiles are more slender, the full overlay door configuration has been restyled to infer a traditionally tailored inset door and the uncomplicated five-piece drawer/door combination offers an updated take on a classic Mission style.

The Morgan Series, originally designed by Scott Stultz in 1996, was intended to capture the simplicity and honesty of the Arts & Crafts movement.

Although displaced for a time by modernism, the Arts and Crafts influence has only increased, and exceptional pieces continue to be in high demand.

“Our Morgan Series has been extremely popular with our designers because it pairs beautifully with a variety of cabinet styles,” explained Jason Artus, vice president of marketing for Rutt HandCrafted Cabinetry. “With the redesign, there is even more versatility. When Scott was doing the redesign, one of the elements that was extremely important to us was for the cabinetry to have lighter proportions, allowing it to not feel overwhelming in small spaces, yet still provide visual richness and movement for larger spaces.”

In addition to the retailored cabinetry, Rutt is introducing an exclusive new color palate, custom accessories, and new custom base cabinetry to accommodate wide kitchen sinks up to 84-inches.

Among the featured products include: docking drawer; grey non-slip mat; custom Exeter decorative hardware; and white oak drawers and accessories

“When designing the retailored Morgan Series, I followed a strategy of horizontal and vertical framing members that are offset from one another in a layered progression. This creates a pattern similar to Woven fabric, but at a larger scale,” said Scott Stultz, product developer for Rutt. “The visual logic of the system is clear and intuitive, with planar transitions softened by slightly rounded long edges.”  See http://ruttcabinetry.com.

 

 

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